Critical Section


the inflection point

Wednesday,  08/09/06  11:23 PM

Friends, colleagues, blog visitors, lend me your eyes...

Tonight I had a weird and moving experience which I wanted to share.  Here’s the message: life is short, and you should enjoy each day as if it were your last, because you never know what will happen.

As you may know I live in Westlake Village, CA, about 140 miles northwest of my office in Vista, CA, and hence I have a rather long commute.  I’ve been driving down to Vista at least once a week for nearly five years now, and it really isn’t bad; I enjoy the drive time as a quiet time for reflection and planning.  In those five years I’ve seen my share of accidents but fortunately I’ve avoided any myself and have had only a few annoying near misses (knocking on wood).  However, tonight as I was traveling home from the office I had the experience of seeing three entirely separate horrible fatal accidents.  I didn’t see any of them happen, but in each case I was close enough that emergency vehicles were still arriving as I sat in traffic behind them.

The first was a big truck which jackknifed across the center divider just South of the border control station in Camp Pendleton, smashing at least two other cars in the process.  The second was a three car accident where the 73 joins the 405, seemingly caused by a car ramming the end of a guardrail and subsequently bursting into flame.  The third was a car which ran into the center divider of the 405 in the Sepulveda Pass (north of L.A.), and then bounced across five lanes of traffic before ramming a hillside and flipping, spinning and smashing at least three other cars as it did so.  Each accident was worse than the previous, and seeing all three in sequence was a spooky and sobering experience.

It occurred to me that ordinary people like you and me died in these accidents, within minutes of the time I passed them.  They got up that morning living their day per usual, going about their business, with no idea at all that this day was going to be their last.  If they had known, maybe they would have kissed their kids a little longer, or hugged their dogs, or been nicer to their colleagues in email.  Maybe they would have made a donation to a charity, or spent time in their backyard enjoying the sun.  Or coded an amazing piece of software :)

I don’t want to be too sappy about this, but for me this really was an “inflection point”.  The memory of that drive is going to stay with me, and I’m going to try to live each day as if it were my last, because you just never know.

Home
Archive
'13   '12   '11
'10   '09   '08
'07   '06   '05
'04   '03   all
About Me
W=UH
Email
RSS   OPML

Greatest Hits
Correlation vs. Causality
The Tyranny of Email
Unnatural Selection
Lying
Aperio's Mission = Automating Pathology
On Blame
Try, or Try Not
Books and Wine
Emergent Properties
God and Beauty
Moving Mount Fuji The Nest Rock 'n Roll
IQ and Populations
Are You a Bright?
Adding Value
Confidence
The Joy of Craftsmanship
The Emperor's New Code
Toy Story
The Return of the King
Religion vs IQ
In the Wet
the big day
solving bongard problems
visiting Titan
unintelligent design
Shorthorn
the nuclear option
second gear
On the Persistence of Bad Design...
Texas chili cookoff
the inflection point
almost famous design and stochastic debugging
may I take your order?
paper art
triple double
New Yorker covers
Death Rider! (da da dum)
how did I get here (Mt.Whitney)?
the Law of Significance
Holiday Inn
Daniel Jacoby's photographs
in praise of paddle shifting
the first bird
Gödel Escher Bach: Birthday Cantatatata
shining a light
Father's Day (in pictures)
your cat for my car
discovering the third quadrant
Jobsnotes of note
world population map
no joy in Baker
introducing eyesFinder